Notable Alumni

Please get in touch if you have any news since leaving Caterham School.

Sam Talbot

(OC 2013–2017)

Sam Talbot is a long jump and heptathlon athlete, and competed for Team GB in the World Indoor Youth Heptathlon in 2016.

Rosie Clarke

(OC 2003–2010)

Rosie Clarke is a steeplechase athlete, and competed for Team GB in the IAAF World Championships in 2017.

Geoffrey Pidgeon

(OC 1936–1940)

Geoffrey Pidgeon is an author and former MI6 officer.

Chuk Iwuji

(OC 1987–1993)

Chuk Iwuji is an actor, famous for his roles as Henry VI with the Royal Shakespeare Company and Løvborg in Ivo van Hove’s Hedda Gabler at the National Theatre.

Professor Michael Aminoff

(OC 1953–1959)

Michael Aminoff is a professor of neurobiology and the author of a number of medical textbooks and biographies which have been widely published in the US and UK.

Charlie Ferriday (OC 2003–2008), Roger Connick (OC 1999-2006), Stuart Connick (OC 1999–2008), Edd Simpson (OC 2001–2008)

Narrow Plains

Charlie Ferriday, Roger Connick, Stuart Connick, and Edd Simpson are members of the band Narrow Plains, which is signed with American label Spectra Music Group.

The Honourable Mr Justice Graeme Mew

(OC 1968–1977)

Graeme Mew is a judge of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, the senior trial court in Canada’s largest province.

Dr Luke Bashford

Luke Bashford is a research scientist specialising in prosthesis design.

Angus Deayton

(OC 1965–1974)

Angus Deayton is an actor, writer, musician, comedian and broadcaster famous for his appearances on Have I Got News for You.

Hayden Allan

(OC 1991–1999)

Hayden Allan is a former communications director to the British Chancellor of the Exchequer.

James Benning

(OC 1996–2000)

James Benning is a cricketer who played for Leicestershire County Cricket Club and Surrey.

Sir Paul Dukes, KBE

(OC 1900–1906)

Paul Dukes was an author and MI6 officer.

General Sir Alexander Harley KBE, CB

(OC 1953–1960)

Alexander Harley is a retired British Army officer and former Adjutant-General to the Forces.

Sir Alan Moncrief

(OC 1912-1918)

Sir Alan Aird Moncrief KBE, OBE, MRCS, LRCP, MB BS, MRCP, MD, FRCP, Hon FRCOG, JP (9 October 1901, Bournemouth – 24 July 1971) was a British born paediatrician and professor emeritus at University of London. He was most notable for developing the first premature-baby unit in 1947. It was Moncrief who recognized and developed the concept of daily parental visits to the ward, which he developed while at Great Ormond Street, well before the need for this became recognised, and with his ward sister, published an article on Hospital Visiting for Children in 1949.

Stephen Bonarjee

(OC 1926-1929)

Stephen Bonarjee was the father of analytical journalism on BBC Radio. At a time when colleagues expected listeners to defect to television, he recognised the enduring power and intimacy of the senior service. Bonarjee designed radio programmes that remain staples of the Radio 4 schedule three decades after he retired. He created From Our Own Correspondent and defined the purpose of the Today programme, setting it on course to become the nation's daily agenda setter.